sketching por la isla: tren urbano

Here are some sketches I made on our last tour sketching por la isla. This time we decided to draw from the “Tren Urbano” (San Juan’s only metro line).

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inside the train car; the curved buildings of el monte housing complex (where I live); tunnel entrance; san juan’s courthouse façade detail; and grab bar detail.

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rum testing laboratories’ building at san juan’s botanical gardens; and escalators atrium at centro medicos’ station.

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covered platform at cupey station.

sketching por la isla: yauco y san germán

Estos son algunos bocetos que realicé el pasado sábado mientras acompañaba a Jorge Rigau y su curso de Historia del Caribe.
Here are some sketches I did last Saturday on a trip with Jorge Rigau’s course on History of Caribbean Architecture.

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Condición urbana (parque/plaza) en Yauco; diagrama espacial de la residencia Franceschi (tipo sala-pasillo-comedor) y alzado parcial de la Villa Ange del arquitecto Pedro Méndez.

20120201-000428.jpgFachada frontal de la Ermita de Porta Coeli y un diagrama de la condición urbana (parque/plaza) en San Germán.

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Diagrama espacial de la Residencia Acosta y Forés (tipo A-B-A), perspectiva del mediopunto en la sala y un detalle de los estarcidos del área del comedor.

20120201-000552.jpgDiagrama espacial de la Residencia Ortíz Perichi y una perspectiva de la Residencia Vélez del arquitecto Henry Klumb.

convento de las carmelitas, thomas s. marvel

Designed in 1976 by Thomas S. Marvel, the Carmelite Sisters’ Convent in Trujillo Alto is often considered one of the best examples of early brutalism in Puerto Rico. It is troubling how closely it was modeled to resemble Le Corbusier’s convent of La Tourette. However, its proportions lack the mathematical correctness and spatial aspirations of the French masterpiece.

In truth, the similarities lie only within the use itself, the materials employed and its siting. The Convento de las Carmelitas rests on top of a small hill in a somewhat pastoral setting. Exposed concrete or “betón brut” was the main construction material employed.

There is no way to access the main cloister unless one becomes a Carmelite Sister (or a robber, as one of the sisters told us). The only spaces that welcome visitors are the refractory and the chapel which can be accessed through an entrance courtyard. Here’s a view of that space looking towards the main gate, the belfry and the chapel’s entrance. I have also included an interior photograph of the chapel to illustrate the lack of proportions and poor spatial qualities.

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